Pacific Islanders

References for the whole page « Race differences in intelligence. An evolutionary Analysis », Chapter 8, Richard Lynn, Washington Summit Publisher, 1st edition 2006 et 2nd edition 2015. 

Pacific Islanders are the natives of the many Pacific islands, the main ones being New Zealand, the island group of Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia and Hawaii. In their genetic analysis, Cavalli-Sforza, Menozzi and Piazza (1994) identify Micronesians, Polynesians and Melanesians as a separate genetic cluster. The inhabitants of the Pacific Islands are a minor race, with only 1.5 million people. They are about 350 thousand Maori in New Zealand, 380 thousand on the Solomon Islands, and about the same number on the Fiji Islands. Their population is 170 thousand west of the island of Samoa and 100 thousand on Tonga. They are genetically very close to the Southeast Asians (Cambodia, Indonesia …) from which they separated just 6000 years ago.

1. I.Q of Maori in New Zealand

2. I.Q of Other Inhabitants in the Pacific Islands

3. I.Q of Pacific Islanders-Europeans hybrids and Pacific Islanders-Chinese hybrids


1. I.Q of Maori in New Zealand

The median value is 85.

Table 9.1. IQs of New Zealand Maoris

Age
N
Test
g
Reas
Verb
Vis
Reference
1
12-41
53
WB
91
92
94
Adcock et al., 1954
2
13
214
PMA
90
90
94
87
Walters, 1958
3
15
98
OTIS
82
Ausubel, 1961
4
11
18
WB
81
79
84
Ritchie, 1966
5
8-12
238
OTIS
85
Lovegrove, 1966
6
13-14
236
OTIS
81
Du Chareau, 1967
7
14
77
OTIS
84
Martin, 1969
8
5-7
80
Verbal
90
90
Clay, 1971
9
14
55
SPM
88
Codd, 1972
10
4-6
151
PIPS
96
St. George & St.
George, 1975
11
9
211
SPM/VC
91
91
91
Harker, 1978
12
8-14
303
QT
95
St. George, 1983
13
10-12
130
TOSCA
90
St. George &
Chapman, 1983
14
8-9
22
WISC-R
92
Fergusson et al.,
1991
15
Adults
103
VR
92
Guenole et al., 2003

2. I.Q of other inhabitants in the Pacific Islands

The median value is 85.
Table 9.2. IQs of Pacific Islanders
Location
Age
N
Test
g
Reference
1
Hawaii
6-12
105
Binet
85
Porteus & Babcock,
1926
2
Hawaii
10-14
302
NV
90
Smith, 1942
3
Hawaii
10-14
319
NV
82
Smith, 1942
4
Mariana Islands
6-16
200
Arthur
81
Joseph & Murray,
1951
5
Marshall Islands
12-18
407
CF
84
Jordheim & Olsen,
1963
6
Samoa
5-7
80
Verbal
90
Clay, 1971
7
Papua N. Guinea
17-18
152
SOP
82
Waldron & Gallimore,
1973
8
Cook Islands
4-6
110
PIPS
89
St. George, 1974
9
Fiji
12
76
QT
84
Chandra, 1975
10
Tonga
8-9
80
PAT
86
Beck & St. George,
1983
11
Papua N. Guinea
7-10
241
BG
83
Robin & Shea, 1983
12
Hawaii-Filipinos
16
3,507
STAS
89
Brandon et al., 1987
13
New Caledonia
5-10
96
KB
85
Cottereau-Reiss &
Lehalle, 1988
14
Pacific Islands
9-17
65
SPM
88
Reid & Gilmore, 1989

3. I.Q of Pacific Islanders-Europeans hybrids and Pacific Islanders-Chinese hybrids

The I.Q of both groups of hybrid children are slightly above the average of the two parental races. The average IQ of European / Hawaiian couples is 90.5, while the IQ of their children is 93. Similarly, the average IQ of Chinese / Hawaiian couples is 90, whereas the IQ of children is 91.
The average IQs of the hybrids, slightly higher than the prediction based on the average of the two parental races, can be attributed to the phenomenon of « hybrid vigor » or heterosis, often present in crosses between two different populations. The same phenomenon was found in Hawaii in a study of children of Asiatic and European parents, whose IQ was 4 points higher than children of Asians and Europeans (Nagoshi and Johnson, 1986). couples of parents had the same education and comparable socio-economic status, suggesting that this is a genetic effect.

mkb042713b/metro/Marla Brose/042713
Maringi Ngata-Campbell, left, holds her cousin Takiri Mai Te Ata Reweti, 7, as she and other Te Awaroa o Kahu people from Tauranga Moana, New Zealand, participate in Saturday’s Gathering of Nations Powwow’s Grand Entry in Albuquerque, N.M., April 27, 2013. Takiri Mai Te Ata Reweti holds her face in a traditional expression during the dance. (Marla Brose/Albuquerque Journal)

Maori in New Zealand

References for the whole page « Race differences in intelligence. An evolutionary Analysis », Chapter 8, Richard Lynn, Washington Summit Publisher, 1st edition 2006 et 2nd edition 2015.